Inkan=Hanko(Seal) Shop 【SHIBUYA HANKO-DOU】

It is a Inkan(Seal) shop only for Japanese domestic resident's foreigner.



Inkan(Seal) 印鑑
TOP | Order | COMPANY | MAP | Japan version | mail  | Link |

Seal (=Inkan) necessary to live in japan
日本で生活するには印鑑が必要

Audio version information 1

After settling down in Japan, there are certain things foreigners need to do including applying for an Alien Registration card and opening a bank account .However, the first thing they need is a seal ( called an "Inkan" or a"Hanko"). In Western countries, it is common to put a signature on documents, but in Japan, you usually have to stamp your seal instead. Although there are many instances where signatures are accepted recently, for the majority of important documents your seal will definitely be required even if you have signed your name.
日本の生活に落ち着いたら、役所に外国人登録書を申請したり、銀行口座を開設したりする。そこでまず必要となるのが印鑑(「はんこ」とも呼ばれる)です。欧米では書類には署名をするのが普通だが、日本では印鑑を押す。最近では署名だけで済ませる場合もあるが、重要な書類になれば、自筆で署名した場合にも印鑑は絶対に必要となる。

There are two kinds of seals: one is a registered seal and the other is a ready-made seal called a "sanmomban." The registered seal is the one you registered at the Registry office and use for official documents. Since it is supposed to last a lifetime, many people have it made from high quality materials. Also, more than a few people go in for taking the advice of fortune tellers for the design of the letters on their seals for good luck. The Registry office is located in each district (ward city, town and village). The registration procedure is simple, as you just bring your seal and register it.
印鑑には実印と、いわゆる「三文判」と呼ばれるものがある。実印は登記所に登録した印鑑で、公的な書類に用いられる。これは一生使用するものだから、高級な素材が使用される。また、縁起をかつぎ、占師のアドバイスを聞いて文字のデザインに凝る人も少なくない。登記所は各区、市長村にある。印鑑を持参し、手続きをすれば登録される。

A "sanmonban"is used in the daily lives of many peaple in place of a signature, for example when you receive registered mail or packages from delivery companies. Sanmonban are not decoratively made and are available ready-made featuring most Japanese names at stationary and department stores for around hundred yen. On registered seals, it is common that both the family and first name are engraved, but only surnames are used on sanmonban.
三文判は、認印として日常生活で使用されている。たとえば、郵便書留や宅配便を受け取るときなどです。三文判は簡単なつくりものが多く、日本人の多くの名前の三文判は、既製品として用意されていて、文房具店やデパートなどで百円程で売られている。実印は苗字と名前が彫られるのが普通だが、三文判は苗字だけが彫られている。

Seal can be sculpted in katakana or kanji
はんこはカタカナでも漢字でも作れる

In Japan, there is a hanko-ya (seal shop), where you can have your seal made, in every town. In these shops you can place an order for a registered seal to be made as well as for a sanmonban featuring a name that is not among the readymade seals. Registered seals can cost anywhere between afew thousand yen and maybe up to hundreds of thousands of yen. However it despends on the materials and design used. On the countrary, sanmonban only cost around 1,000yen.
日本には判子屋さんと呼ばれる印鑑を作るお店がどの街にもある。実印や既製品で売られていない名前の三文判はここで作ってもらうことになる。実印は素材やデザインなどによるが、数千円から数十万円する。三文判は千円前後で作ってもらえる。

While there may never come a time when you need to use a seal (becouse as a foreign citizen you will likely be asked for signature), it will however be more convenient to at least have a sanmonban. For foreigners, either their surname or first name can be used but many have them made in katakana. Katakana are the closest representations of foreign words in Japanese However, the representation of katakana can differ according to the person who writes it.
外国人の場合には、印鑑のかわりに署名だけですませることがあるので、必ずしも作る必要はないが、少なくとも三文判はあったほうが便利です。外国人なら、苗字でも名前でもかまわないが、文字はカタカナ文字で作ることが多い。カタカナは外国語の発音を日本語に近い音に置き換えたものです。しかし、書く人によって、文字は異なることがあります。

For instance, "Vincent" can be written in katakana as either "ビンセント" or "ヴィンセント". It would be best to ask Japnese for advice about appropriate spelling. Also instead of using katakana,kannji can be used. By joining the kanji letters together you can create names with different meanings. Take "敏先斗", for example, which means a person who can see the future. However, there are some names that are impossible to be replaced with kanji.
たとえば、「Vincent」は「ビンセント」とも「ヴィンセント」とも書ける。日本人と相談して決めた方が良い。また、カタカナの代わりに漢字を用いることもできる。その場合、文字の組み合わせでさまざまな意味を持った名前ができます。「敏先斗」とした場合、未来を感じられる人という意味になります。但し、漢字を当てはめられない名前もあります。


Requirements for opening a bank account differ by bank
口座開設は銀行により異なる

Audio version information 2

To open a bank account, it is necessary to show your ID (passport or driver's license) and a certificate to prove your address (ie:your Alien Registration card).
You are also required to bring your seal (signatures are accepted at some banks) and a deposit (over 1 yen in cash). You can also open an account at the post office in a similar manner.

銀行口座の開設には、身分を証明できるもの(パスポート、運転免許証など)と日本での住所を証明できるもの(外国人登録証明書など)の提示が必要となる。それに、印鑑(銀行によってはサインでも良い)と預金(1円以上の現金)を持参する。郵便局でも、銀行とほぼ同じ方法で口座を開設できます。

In fact, the opening of bank accounts by foreigners' is generally not welcomed. This is to prevent crimes such as money laundering, and the use of fictitious names for bank accounts. But the true reason is that the savings of foreign residents are generally small and therefore banks do not benefit much. The category of foreigners who can open accounts is limited to "residents". The interpretation of "residents"and relevant account opening procedures differ by bank.
外国人の口座開設は、基本的には歓迎されていないのが事実です。マネーロンダリングや偽名口座など犯罪に使用されることを防ぐためです。しかし、外国人滞在者の預金高は一般的に少なく、銀行としてのメリットが少ないというのが本音といえよう。口座が開設できるのは「居住者」に限られるが、「居住者」の解釈は銀行により異なり対応はさまざまなようです。

"Residents" are interpreted as those who stay in Japan for more than six months under the Foreign Currency Exchange Control Law. However, alien registration is necessary for those who stay in Japan for more than 90 days. In all cases, it is difficult for short stayers to open bank accounts. Most bank accounts for foreigners are registered in either katakana or romaji. In the case of katakana, be sure to remember how to write your name, otherwise you will not be able to make withdrawals.
外国為替管理法での「居住者」は、入国後6ヶ月以上経過する者と解釈されている。しかし、90日以上滞在する人は外国人登録が必要です。いずれにしても、短期滞在は開設しにくいのが現実です。口座名はカタカナ、あるいはローマ字の場合がほとんどです。カタカナの場合、自分で書けるようにしていないと、引き出すことができなくなるので注意が必要です。

An order for seal is this place.


sibuya-hanko hiraganatimes
Information about Jobs, Accommodation, Visa, Travel, Japanese Language Schools and Friends Finding in Japan and more